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TIME

Looking good is just as much about taking care of your body on the inside as it is about using products on the outside. And we’re not just talking about your skin: “A nutritious diet promotes healthy nails and hair, too,” says Joshua Zeichner, MD, director of cosmetic and clinical research in the department of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. But there’s no need to add a refrigerator’s worth of new foods to your diet. “Since both hair and nails are made of keratin, through a similar process in the body, it’s thought that nutrients that help one can also help the other,” says Dr. Zeichner. Ready to say bye-bye to brittleness? Read on for foods that give your hair and nails a boost.

RELATED: 16 Biggest Myths About Your Hair

Whey protein

“Your hair needs protein to produce keratin, the proteins that make hair strong,”…

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Hello All,

It’s been a busy June so far and extensions are the reason for it. I’ve done two big Great Lengths makeovers that I wanted to share with you. Both were between 5-6 hour services, and both were to add length and thickness.

Rachel has fine hair and slightly damaged due to over styling and over processing. I used 12″ Great Lengths hair in colors 64, 19, & 09, standard bundles cut down to extra fine and custom bonds. The placement blended quite well into her ombre hair color done by John O’Brien at Antonio Prieto Salon.

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Before…and….

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After!

My next client Erin also wanted a bit of length and fullness. I used 16″ Great Lengths hair in colors 64, 84 & 09. Standard bundles cut down into extra fine bonds to blend with her natural density.

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Before…and…

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After.

In both cases, cutting and blending the extensions into their natural hair is key. In my opinion it’s the difference between noticeable extensions that people on the street point at and stage whisper to their friend and say, “she has extensions” and seamless extensions that are undetectable and people on the street say to their friend, “I love her hair”. While there is skill and an eye for placement involved with an extension service, once you have your rhythm down, it’s 4-6 hours of the same repetitive movement. You only get one shot at blending the extensions into the natural hair. If you cut the extensions too short or create an awkward layer you have to take those out and put new ones in.

These will last approximately 4 months and dry with a soft wave to blend into their natural texture.

You don’t always have to go for length and fullness. Some clients are happy with their current length, but just want to add fullness and volume to what they have. In that case you need a lot less Great Lengths hair and it’s also a great way to experiment with extensions.

If you’re curious, make a consultation at a certified Great Lengths salon. http://getgreatlengths.com/salonlocator.aspx

 

A Scandalous Up Do!

January 20, 2014 — Leave a comment

The Screen Actors Guild awards were on Saturday night, and there were some really beautiful hairstyles from the evening. I was looking through all of the styles and wanted to find a hairstyle that I could explain how to achieve the look at home. I wanted to find something that was simple, elegant and playful and could be worn to a formal event or to a Friday night dinner.

I chose Kerry Washington’s updo from the Screen Actors Guild awards. It’s clean, simple and fun!

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There are a couple of things to consider for this style like, how high or low do you want the bun to sit and how much height do you want on top.

Step 1. With all of your hair down, take a round, “halo” section where you want the bun to sit. If it’s straight off the back of your head like in the picture then your section will sit somewhere in the lower crown area, above the occipital bone. The halo section will vary depending on hair density. The more hair you have the bigger the section.

Step 2. Gather that hair and make a ponytail. Slide a hair donut (matched to your hair shade. I prefer the donut to always be slightly darker than your hair color) over the ponytail and bobby pin into the round base of that section. The donut gives you the elevation off the back of the head without having to excessively backcomb.

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Step 3. Gather all of the remaining hair, pull it back and over the hair donut and join to the existing ponytail. Place another ponytail holder over that section.

Step 4. Take the ponytail and lightly twist and coil around the base of that section, pin and secure.

If you are using a headband that has a velcro, snap or adjustable closure you can add it at this time. If you are using a headband that stretches to fit snugly to the head, put the headband on FIRST before any of the steps. Wear it around your neck and after you finish the last step you can pull it up and into place.

Finish with take a metal tailcomb and spray it with hairspray and glide it over the style to smooth out any fly away hairs.

Here are some other variations of the same look. Enjoy!

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2013 Hair Trend

January 9, 2013 — Leave a comment

My first blog post ever in 2012 was about the Lob (Long Bob). I talked about the versatility of this style and how it’s a great choice if you have long hair but are afraid to make a huge change. Well, according to fashionising.com this hairstyle is still going to be a favorite in 2013 as seen on model Anja Rubik in this Dolce & Gabbana ad for Elle UK, February 2013.

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The key to this style is the perfect length. It should be an inch to two inches below the shoulder. It can be worn with or without a fringe/bang. The fringe can be wispy like in this ad or a heavy, blunt  bang can be added. This style should not be overly styled. The goal is messy textured waves.

If you’re looking for a new look and want to be on trend for 2013 give this look a try.

Patrick Cameron (Day 2)

November 28, 2012 — Leave a comment

Well, my cold got the best of me. Unfortunately I will not be attending the second day of class:-( Back to bed.

Flexing your muscle

November 27, 2012 — 2 Comments

I have a quick story/observation about today’s class and I only bring it up because this is something I’ve noticed with other classes I’ve taken in the past. Whenever you get a group of hairstylists together that don’t know each other something really interesting happens, and it’s not always good.

Like I said in my previous post, there was 25-30 of us in the class. We worked at small rectangular tables, 4 per table. The 3 other stylists at my table were from the same salon, F******* F**** (you figure it out). Now, even though in high school I was fairly popular I’ve never experienced first hand being shunned. I tried some icebreakers, eye contact, and blatantly interjecting myself into their conversations. I definitely chose the wrong table.

I think what happens with hairstylists, specifically in NYC, is that when they come from a salon that is owned by someone famous they think that their personal work is somehow legitimized and flawless. It was a little amusing really because while their skills were fair at best, the self-proclaimed importance was over the top.  Btw, in a side by side split screen comparison, I totally smoked them with every look. Snap!

As an educational director I’m really interested in raising the bar for fellow stylists by sharing knowledge I learn from classes like these and through things I’ve figured out along the way on my own. It’s counterproductive, in my opinion, to go to a training class, to work on your craft, and then pose like you’re too good for it, or too good to work with other people in your industry.

So, I’m curious to ask my legion’s of blog followers. Does this happen in your profession? Do other people in your profession need to flex their muscle (importance) during seminars, conferences, meetings, etc…?